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Riverside Truck Accident Attorney

Estey & Bomberger Handle Accidents with Trucks Throughout Riverside County

Steve Estey explains trucking accident cases:

People traveling in smaller vehicles are extremely vulnerable when it comes to accidents involving a truck. Trucks often weigh 20 to 30 times as much as passenger cars. They are taller and have greater ground clearance. And these factors can often result in smaller vehicles under-riding trucks in crashes.

According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, 3,373 people died in large truck crashes in 2011. Sixteen percent of those deaths were truck occupants, but 66 percent were occupants of cars and other passenger vehicles. And 16 percent were pedestrians, bicyclists or motorcyclists.

What’s more, the number of people who died in large truck or semi-truck crashes was seven percent higher in 2011 than in 2009.

Trucking accidents are a very serious threat. Ninety-eight percent of vehicle occupants killed in two-vehicle crashes involving a passenger vehicle and a large truck in 2011, were occupants of the passenger vehicle.

  • 3,373 people died in large truck crashes in 2011
  • 16 percent of those deaths were truck occupants
  • 66 percent of deaths were occupants of cars and other passenger vehicles
  • 16 percent of related deaths were pedestrians, bicyclists or motorcyclists

The injuries that result from being involved in an accident with a truck include spine and head injuries, amputations, brain damage or death.

The aftermath of such accidents can often be overwhelming. Understanding what steps to take, what your rights are and who to contact can be confusing. If you or someone you know has been involved in an accident with a truck or semi-truck, Estey & Bomberger is available to help. We have a team of experts who available to guide you through the process to recovery. 

Causes of Truck Accidents in Riverside

There’s a variety of factors that can lead to truck accidents including:

  • Truck braking capability. For instance, loaded tractor-trailers take 20 to 40 percent farther than cars to stop, and this discrepancy is greater on wet and slippery roads or with poorly maintained brakes.
  • Driver fatigue. Drivers of large trucks are allowed by federal hours-of-service regulations to drive up to 11 hours at a stretch and up to 77 hours over a seven-day period. But according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, surveys indicate that many drivers violate the regulations and work longer than permitted.
  • Alcohol. This is one of the more rare causes of such accidents, however, in 2011, two percent of fatally injured large truck drivers had blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) at or above 0.08 percent, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.
  • Drugs. Drug use among truck drivers is a more common cause of accidents than alcohol. According to a 1995 study reported by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, illicit drugs such as marijuana, cocaine or amphetamines/methamphetamines are more prevalent than alcohol. Almost five percent of truck drivers involved in a roadside study in four states tested positive for illicit drug use.

Additional causes of an accident include speeding, tailgating, aggressive driving and trucks without blind spot mirrors. 

The Large Truck Crash Causation Study by FMCSA

FactorsNumber of TrucksPercent of TotalRelative Risk
Vehicle: Brake problems41,00029%2.7
Driver: Traveling too fast for conditions32,00023%7.7
Driver: Unfamiliar with roadway31,00022%2
Environment: Roadway problems29,00020%1.5
Driver: Over-the-counter drug use25,00017%1.3
Driver: Inadequate surveillance20,00014%9.3
Driver: Fatigue18,00013%8
Driver: Felt under work pressure from carrier16,00010%4.7
Driver: Made illegal maneuver13,0009%26.4
Driver: Inattention12,0009%17.1
Driver: External distraction11,0008%5.1
Vehicle: Tire problems8,0006%2.5
Driver: Following too close7,0005%22.6
Driver: Jackknife7,0005%4.7
Vehicle: Cargo shift6,0004%56.3
Driver: Illness4,0003%34
Driver: Internal distraction3,0002%5.8
Driver: Illegal drugs3,0002%1.8
Driver: Alcohol1,0001%5.3

What should you do Immediately After a Truck Accident?

There are several important steps to take after an accident. They include the following:

  • Collecting evidence. This includes taking photographs of the accident site, obtaining the truck driver’s insurance and license information and gathering the names of any other people involved in the accident. It is also a good idea to get the name and phone number of any witnesses.
  • Reporting the Accident. The accident should be reported to local police or highway patrol immediately. The accident report is a valuable piece of evidence later on.
  • Going to a doctor.  Getting medical attention immediately is very important, even if you think your injuries are very minor. Being seen by a medical professional will allow you to rule out or document any injuries – including head, neck, back or internal injuries.

Consult an Experienced Riverside Truck Accident Lawyer

As the knowledgeable Riverside accident lawyers at Estey & Bomberger, LLP, we have represented thousands of clients involved in truck accidents. Our due diligence, knowledge and hard work has enabled clients to obtain millions of dollars in damages.  We work on a contingency basis. That means you don’t have to pay us any money unless we win your case and you’re awarded financial damages.

If you have questions about such accidents or have been injured in such an accident, make an appointment for a free case evaluation in our Riverside office today! (951) 543-9020

Start your recovery today

If you are hesitant to contact us about your claim, it may help you to gain an understanding of what personal injury law is, and what is is not. We are ready to help you. Whether you prefer talking on the phone, coming into our office in Riverside, or you need us to come to where you are, give us a call at 951-543-9020 to schedule an appointment.

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